“The court concludes that the plaintiffs have not raised any serious questions…(and) even if the questions were sufficiently serious, injunctive relief would be unwarranted.”

Judge Ramos throwing serious legal shade:

The Manhattan federal judge who immediately blocked an attempt from President Trump to halt a Congressional subpoena for his financial records told private attorneys hired by the President that their case was not “serious.”

During the hour-long read of his opinion on Wednesday, U.S. District Judge Edgardo Ramos drew a distinction between the “serious political ramifications” of the investigation into a president’s finances, and what constitutes a “serious” question to be considered by a judge.

“The court concludes that the plaintiffs have not raised any serious questions,” Ramos said.

He added that, “even if the questions were sufficiently serious, injunctive relief would be unwarranted.”

[…]

The judge drew special attention to the question of timing during his ruling, saying that “any delay in the proceedings may result in irreparable harm to the Committees.”

He added that the law in the matter was “well-settled.”

“Courts have long recognized a clear public interest in maximizing Congress’s power to investigate,” Ramos intoned.

Trump had argued that because House Democrats’ motives for accessing the information was “political,” the judge should strike down the subpoenas as unconstitutional.

“Propriety of legislative motives is not a question left to the courts,” Ramos said. He added that, rather, the question was “left to voters, not judges.”

Source: Judge Offers Total Rejection Of Trump Bid To Block Subpoenas

This is one of those instances in which the law is so clear and so settled that SCOTUS will eventually affirm this without comment. In its own way, that will help strengthen our system, as it will once again show just how resilient it truly is.

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